Flight Log for 8 April 2000, Boeing Space Center, Kent, WA

Scattered high clouds, wind 5-15 N, increaseing to 10-20 by 13:00.
Model Flt 
#
Recovery Type Motor Comments
Micro Maxx UFO
4
Featherweight/saucer
Quest Micro Maxx
This was the first Micro Maxx several of the attendees of this launch had seen, and the very low flight was a surprise to some of them; this rocket only lifts about ten feet.  Still, it's pretty reliable, dead stable, and reasonably quick to prep.  Overall, it's pretty cool.
Micro Maxx Vector One
2
1/2" x 12" mylar streamer
Quest Micro Maxx
This simple 3FNC rocket actually gets high enough to think it's a rocket -- on this flight, it probably lofted about 50 feet, then, although the piston had deployed, the streamer failed to unfurl, and the rocket came in like a lawn dar, narrowly missing a man who was video taping the launches of his children.  He didn't even see the rocket coming at him, with his eyes glued to the camera, nor did he notice it was there until people started yelling at him not to move, because of the danger he might step on it.  Fortunately, even if it had hit him, it wouldn't have done any harm; these rockets only weigh a few grams and from 50 feet this one wouldn't have had the energy it would take to do harm unless it struck directly in an open eye -- pretty unlikely, all in all.
Micro Maxx Space Fighter
2
1/2" x 12" mylar streamer
Quest Micro Maxx
Once again, this proved one of the best flying of these tiny RTF models, with a smooth boost, nicely arcing coast -- but then the motor ejected and the model landed like a lawn dart.  Fortunately, I was able to recover the tiny ejected motor and its retaining lock in the tall grass -- it helped that I had seen it eject and had a good idea where it went.  On inspection, there was no damage to the ring -- and I realized I'd probably turned it the wrong way when trying to lock it over the motor; for some reason, all of these models are built to turn the motor retainers counterclockwise to lock.  In any case, nothing was lost but some dignity -- two lawn darts in a row was not to be tolerated!
Micro Maxx Space Fighter
3
1/2" x 12" mylar streamer
Quest Micro Maxx
An immediate reflight allowed me to show the correct flight characteristics of this tiny ship -- complete to finishing the job initiated on the first flight, of toasting the streamer.  Despite presence of a baffle, the Micro Maxx designs that don't use a piston really cry out for a tiny amount of wadding or a heat resistant Teflon (R) streamer and shock cord.  Perhaps something to try retrofitting -- though in fact I'm probably going to just start scratch building and/or putting Micro Maxx mounts in models that go too high with 13 mm motors, such as the Mosquito or Seattle Rockets Works Nike Smoke I have waiting to be built.
Micro Maxx UFO
5
Featherweight/saucer
Quest Micro Maxx
I wanted another flight of the UFO -- the kids at this launch absolutely loved it, especially in contrast to the Estes Snitch and Quest U.F.O. (full size) on C6-0 motors.  Prepped it up, put it on the pad, and it took me three tries to get the igniter to seat far enough into the nozzle to get ignition -- then disaster, as the tiny saucer stuck on the 1/16" rod and burned the motor still squatting on the igniter body.  Inspection revealed no damage to the pad, but the motor retaining ring was completely toasted, and the rear launch lug had bent down far enough (deforming the heat softened plastic) to lock the motor into the mount.  I may be able to drill it out or force it free from the forward end, however, and this rocket would fly as well with only a light friction fit as with the (not very secure to begin with) motor retainer -- it may yet rise again.
Micro Maxx Space Shuttle
2
1/2" x 12" mylar streamer
Quest Micro Maxx
People were starting to pack up -- the wind was getting some teeth, and we were starting to get a little chilly (especially those who, like me, hadn't brought a jacket because the day started out to pleasantly).  Quickly prepped up, and after a little trouble getting the motor lock to seat correcly due to ejection crud from the previous launch, onto the rod it went, and with immediate ignition this time, it lifted without problems, coast a dozen or so feet vertically, and ejected -- nothing.  The motor stayed in, but the nose cone failed to eject and the streamer didn't deploy; once again, however, sturdy construction and a low flight conspired to prevent damage.  I definitely think it's time to start scratch building for these motors -- my own designs have got to work better than this!  Of course, I'll also need to get some more motors; I only have three left now.


Back to 2 Apr 2000


Forward to 13 May 2000


Back to Launch Logs page.


Back to my Home page.