Flight Log for 13 September 1997, Boeing Space Center, Kent, WA

High clouds increasing to overcast, wind 5-15 N -- too windy to fly boost glide duration; contest postponed until next month.
Model Flt 
#
Recovery Type Motor Comments
Bertha-24 18 12" plastic parasheet w/ spill and vents Estes B6-4 The usual, almost boringly perfect flight for this model.  Despite relatively high wind, recovery was close due to rod angle and weathercocking.
Bertha-24 19 12" plastic parasheet w/ spill and vents Estes A8-3 Very low flight, with weathercocking, max altitude around 50 feet, and ejection about 10 feet up, descending -- just about what I remember from flying this design on this motor type in 1973.  Very good combination when you don't want the model to go too high.
Bertha-24 20 12" plastic parasheet w/ spill and vents Estes A8-3 Less rod angle on this flight resulted in a more vertical flight, with ejection near apogee -- this may be a better combination even than I remember from 24 years ago.  I'll have to get some more A8-3s and try it again.
Maniac 8 18" nylon x-form parachute Estes C6-3 With careful attention to rod angle (not too much tilt, to avoid excessive upwind travel), I was able to launch the Maniac on this minimal motor despite the wind (which was dropping off a little by this time).  Flight was straight and normal, with ejection near apogee; much better than previous attempts with this model/motor combination.
Maniac 9 18" nylon x-form parachute Estes C6-3 Second flight on this combination for the day, everyting just as good as the first, except that the parachute got a bit scorched (not enough wadding, I think), and failed to open.  The rocket tumbled in, but the only damage was a slight bend in the motor hook, which I've had and repaired before on this bird.  I unstuck the parachute and tried again.
Maniac 10 18" nylon x-form parachute Estes C6-3 Third flight on this combination for the day, and again the parachute failed to open.  No new scorches, as far as I could see, but the stiffened nylon seemed to hang up on scorched threads from one layer to the next, and the low ejection velocity wasn't enough to jerk the parachute open.  This time, the rocket cracked one fin near the root (same place as before, but a longer crack this time), requiring repairs at home.  With that I called it a day, packed up my stuff, and headed for home.


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